Hi Jeremy! Thank you for giving me a very straightforward and transparent approach to making your own website. My daughter is a visual artist, and she will be applying to art schools in the next year. A website is necessary for her to show her work (all still paintings) to prospective art school admissions councilors and staff. What would be a good builder to use to "bring to life" her paintings and present them in a simple, tasteful and uncluttered way? And at this time, she is not going to use this site to sell her work, just present it to schools.
When things start to become more complex and you start needing to store user information, collect form input, automatically send emails etc. you’re going to need to learn a server-side language. PHP is the most common and has been around a long time. Others include Python, Perl, Java and Ruby to name a few. You can now also choose to use JavaScript as a server side language with Node.js. You will also need to learn how to write SQL commands to interact directly with a database. (Some types of databases don’t use SQL but the most common ones do.)

A good SEO strategy will organically move you to the top of the search results. With Pay-Per-Click (PPC) ads, you’ll take matters more into your own hands by paying to land atop the searches. The best part? You only have to pay for premium placement if someone clicks on your link. You choose the keywords you want to bring up your ad, and you can set and limit your own budget.
Absolutely awesome! I recommend this course to anyone who feels like learning to code is too hard to start off with, because it really isn't. I thought it was too hard, but Ryan makes it look really easy with his step for step increase in difficulty. I built my own website within a week after starting this course, and it looks really great. Keep it up, Ryan! -- Robert de Kok
Here’s the deal… there’s the difference between knowing how to build a site with HTML5 and CSS3 and knowing how to build one that really wows! Whether its for looks, increasing sales, growing email lists, making your blog look professional or even making a personal page to start getting yourself online, you need to know how to make a site that functions how you want it and that separates you from the average person building average sites online. This course will do that. It’s the difference between being able to create and being able to not only create but impress with some added finishing touches. Its that aha moment - that’s what we’re going for when someone comes to our site and we’re going to teach you how to develop that.

What about if you build a website for someone and they want to be able to update the content themselves without needing to read any code? Most people have very little technical knowledge and just want to be able to upload new pictures and change text by typing into a word processor. This is where the CMS comes in. The most used software on the internet is Wordpress. You’ve probably heard of it; it’s blogging software that has evolved to include some CMS functionality. Along with other offerings like Wix and Weebly, it’s mostly used by people without a technical background as a quick DIY website solution. Themes can easily be bought and installed which provide an instant website and certain content can be updated by an admin area.
One factor that may influence your choice is the decision on whether to use SSL for your website. A site that uses SSL will have a web address starting with "https://" instead of "http://". In ancient times, webmasters typically only bothered to use it if they were selling goods and services and needed to collect credit card numbers, or if they had some sort of facility that required their visitors to log in with a password.
WordPress (either version) is a blog-focused content management system that accepts plug-ins and themes that extend its capabilities to most of what the other products here offer, including commerce. In fact, WordPress.com uses plug-ins such as JetPack to provide many of its features. As a whole, WordPress (either .com or .org) is not as easy to use as the other options in this roundup, but if blogging and site transferability are of key importance and you don't mind digging into its weeds a bit, you should consider the platform. Furthermore, the ability to use WordPress is a valuable skill, as some estimates say that WordPress powers 30 percent of the internet.
I have a store on Ebay and sell collectible postage stamps from all parts of the world. Their auction site is awesome but their fees are becoming outrageous. When you add that to the fees from PayPal, I’m not sure who I am really working for. First of all, is there an auction house plugin that resembles Ebay what you recommend. And secondly, what is the minimum amount of memory my computer should have? I would have about 250 listings at anyone time that would last 7-10 days.
Client side means what goes on in the user’s browser. JavaScript is perhaps the next thing to try adding to your website and it’s where the actual programming begins. Up until now it’s just been writing tags (HTML) and rules (CSS). Javascript will allow your site to react to user actions, rearrange elements on the fly and even add new HTML tags where there weren’t any before. There are many frameworks for Javascript which will save you time and will often do things far more efficiently than you could yourself. JQuery is by far the most popular.
I’m pretty new to the whole web development/design aspect of things. I’ve tinkered before with free things but more specifically with forum design. I’m very interested in building a website but aside from having a main traditional website feel I’m looking to incorporate a forum to it. Would it be possible to do this with this WordPress/BlueHost tutorial here? Or would there be something you recommend for that sort of thing?
Even if you outsource some parts of your business, you still have to keep a watchful eye on the business structure. Just because it’s online doesn’t mean that it’s run any different than a traditional business. In short, be prepared to spend a lot of time improving and adjusting your site. I would personally make a list of everything you should do and start checking off this list as they are completed.
Hi Jeremy. Superb article, which I would also use to describe the other articles and reviews you have created for building a web site. I've understand that Shopify is your primary recommendation for an ECommerce site. I'd like to see the capability of various vendors availing of our site's services to post and sell their products. Can Shopify handle this as well? Thanks for helping a lot of people! Wishing you more success. JP
In December 2009 I was exactly like you. I had no idea. I used the computer to write emails and read the news - I had no idea how to create a website. I remember the feeling of information overload. All the new words, all the advice, all the tips, all the software, all the forums, blogs, websites, books. Like sitting down in the cockpit of a 747 jumbo jet and asked to fly.
A nice article! And yes, it is written in a simplest way yet being very informative. I have already tried some site builders but they were not easy to use. I want to create a simple website, just a pair of pages about my family. I want my friends could view videos and photos of the family celebrations. It'll be good to create the site free of charge. I choose between Weebly and mobirise. They are both free site builders as I know. Can you recommend what builder is easier?
Michael Muchmore is PC Magazine's lead analyst for software and web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazine's coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of web services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazine's S... See Full Bio

Tons of selection and information about different solutions. If you have a very specific question or problem, free resources are great. This is because there are a lot of people writing about very specific problems that are just too specific to cover in a paid course. So when we have a unique problem that a typical guide can’t answer, we usually search for tips and answers in forums and free resources.

I am in the process of rejuvenating my current website. I have someone out of house running it remotely, but want to switch to run it in house myself. I’ve decided to run it via Wix.com, simply because I found it easier to use. However, in some of their more premium (and expensive) packages, they offer x amount of email campaigns with the more expensive packages.. I already have four email accounts set up via the pre-existing website and don’t want these to become void.. I own the pre existing domain already (and want to keep it, which is possible via Wix). Will my pre existing email accounts remain viable even if I switch to a new website company? Can you give me some clarity on the repercussions of switching to Wix.com (I am planning to pay the minimum which allows me get rid of any Wix adverts) will have on my pre existing site in reference to the email accounts already set up.

- SEO AND SOCIAL SHARING OPTIMIZATION: You don't want to work hard and create a beautiful site for it to just disappear into the internet abyss. You want people to be able to find your site and easily share its beauty. SEO and social sharing is just as an important part of HTML as anything else and you'll have the foundational knowledge you need after this course.

Beta testing. Launching your website is an exciting process and people eager to get it live as soon as possible. With all the excitement, often people ignore the testing step. It’s critical you test your website before it goes live. The testing process can seem overwhelming, and you are not sure where to start. We are here to tell you that it’s not that complicated, you just have to check the following points carefully:
These services can host your content on their servers free of charge, but in exchange for that zero cost, your online destination will have a less-than-elegant domain, such as jeffreylwilson.tumblr.com. That might be fine for a personal blog, but it will look too low-rent for a business that wants people to trust it enough to pay for whatever it's selling.

My name is Jamie Spencer and I have been building websites since the beginning of the internet ( shows my age a bit! ) I’ve also been blogging as my main source of income for the past eight years. I have created and sold a wide variety of websites and blogs in different niches which means I am probably in a great place to help you create your first website.
First, let's discuss why you even need a webpage in this day of social media domination of the web. On a personal level, you wouldn't want to send prospective employers to your Facebook page, so a personal website makes more sense as an online, customized resume. Another reason worth consideration, for both personal and business sites, is that building your own site gives you endless design choices. You also have total control over products and services you may sell and how they're delivered.

Because today, after 4years and half of development, well, I can code in C/C++ (advanced programs), .NET (WPF, UWP, Xamarin), Java (Softwares, Android), Go (API, WS) but I never did any website or webapp, so I would like to get into it. I feel like today it’s an important part so why not. But yeah, I feel like WordPress is high-level and I’m more a low-level dev, so what would be the best way to start or just the best approach overall?

Unlike “Field of Dreams,” if you build it, they will not come. And, by they, we mean visitors to your website. Unfortunately, this is a common misconception people have when setting up their websites. They believe that they can purchase a domain name and will instantly see traffic. And this can be difficult to accept when you’re relying on your website as a source of income.


WordPress (either version) is a blog-focused content management system that accepts plug-ins and themes that extend its capabilities to most of what the other products here offer, including commerce. In fact, WordPress.com uses plug-ins such as JetPack to provide many of its features. As a whole, WordPress (either .com or .org) is not as easy to use as the other options in this roundup, but if blogging and site transferability are of key importance and you don't mind digging into its weeds a bit, you should consider the platform. Furthermore, the ability to use WordPress is a valuable skill, as some estimates say that WordPress powers 30 percent of the internet.
There are a number of free and commercial web editors available. If you use Windows, one of the best around is Microsoft Expression Web. This was a formerly commercial program that Microsoft now distributes for free, presumably because they no longer want to be in the web editor business. It is fully-featured and very polished (as befits software that was once sold in shops) with facilities that both new and experienced webmasters find useful. You can find a guide on how to use this program from my Expression Web Tutorial. The latter takes you through the process of designing a fully functional multi-page website that is mobile-friendly (that is, your site will work well on both desktop/laptop computers and the smaller screens of mobile devices like smartphones and tablets). Instructions on how to get the editor can also be found in that tutorial.
You can take photos on your own or find stock photography websites that sell professional photos at a reasonable price. Some websites charge a fee for their images, and other provide them for free. If you decide to use images found online, make sure they are from royalty-free sources. Many images have copyrights and you need permission to use them on your website.
Hey, Jeremy, thanks for an informative article. I'm planing to start my own blog but choosing the right hosting provider gets me a bit confused... I'm still a beginner at this, so would prefer something that would offer a free plan, at least for testing purposes. A (very!) user friendly interface is obviously a must... Could you please share some hosting companies that match my requests or at least point me in the right direction where to find them? Many thanks.
Content and discussion threads in forums are not organized in an easy to digest way like in paid courses. If you are good at piecing together scattered information, this may not be a problem for you. But for the vast majority of people, this can slow down your learning process since you’ll need to dig through a mountain of information to find the one that is useful to you.
You've got the site, now you need some visitors. How are they going to find you? Search engines, naturally — and where your site ranks can have a huge impact on your business. GoCentral Website Builder helps improve your rank on Google, Yahoo and Bing by automatically reviewing your site and adding relevant, high-value keywords and phrases. And a higher rank means more visitors.
This brings us to the topic of Search Engine Optimization, or SEO. Now, I’m going to be honest – SEO can be a complex business. After all, we’re talking about trying to make our websites look good to a mindbogglingly complicated algorithm, which has details that Google keeps closely guarded. Oh, and of course, millions upon millions of other sites are trying to do the same thing.
For years Adobe Dreamweaver has been synonymous with web page creation. It's gone from being a creator of HTML pages in a WYSIWYG interface to being able to handle programming pages in Cold Fusion, JavaScript, PHP, and other formats. Its liquid layout lets you see how pages look at different browser and screen sizes—even on smartphones and tablets. It's about as code-heavy as you want it to be.
I’m an employer and I don’t really care where you went to school or what your GPA was — I want to know what you’ve done. Paid off student loan debt bytutoring computer science in New York? Rock on. Raised $20,000 on kickstarter for a Daft Punk tribute album? Awesome! Started the ‘dear photograph’ meme? Splendid! Blogged years worth of eating across the world and now creating food-tour-guides? Now we’re cooking with bacon.
Hi ify, The best advice I could offer is to give the free trials a go on Wix, Weebly and Squarespace and see how you get on with each builder. This will give you a chance to explore their functionalities and see how feasible your ideas are. Squarespace is highly regarded as a portfolio website builder and that sounds like it may be something in line with your ambitions (e.g. showcasing make up examples). Hope that helps, - Tom
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